Upstream Nymph Carron Outing 2017

Today was the outing of the Facebook Group “Upstream Nymph” on the River Carron. A day for those in particular who had not fished our wee river, to try somewhere different. Organised by Cailean Moore , the Group admin, the opportunity was there to try out some of the methods he espouses or indeed stick to what you are comfortable with whether that be Dry fly, wets or whatever.Facebook Group “Upstream Nymph” on the River Carron. A day for those in particular who had not fished our wee river, to try somewhere different. Organised by Cailean Moore , the Group admin, the opportunity was there to try out some of the methods he espouses or indeed stick to what you are comfortable with whether that be Dry fly, wets or whatever.

Upstream Nymph Group

The Upstream Nymph group at the Carron this morning

Saturday was a bit of a thundery day and the later rain put a wee bit water in the river, and a whole lot of colour downstream of the Bonny Water, so area’s like Larbert Viaduct, which was the initial assembly point was pretty opaque for the most part. Once upstream of the burn’s inflow however and while it wasn’t Gin-clear it was more tea coloured with the bottom clearly visible in most areas. The colour didn’t stop some anglers getting some impressive bags though and one had two fish within minutes of approaching the viaduct.

We split into smaller groups, dictated mostly by the preference of method and I led a group of three anglers up to the section downstream of Horsemill Inn to the Checkbar Bridge.

The Mayfly

A  number of fellow anglers told me they thought this to be E. Danica but we now think it is the Large Brook Dun (Ecdyonurus torrentis) on the Carron.

Two anglers opted to fish by the quarry initially and one went with me a wee bit further upstream and tried his luck there. Kevin, the angler who came with me, had a reasonable, probably wild fish pretty quickly on a dry and while I was watching him fish I came across what we initially thought was Ephemera Danica, a pukka Mayfly, which was resting on a blade of grass. So we have real Mayfly on the Carron?

I myself decided I would try nymphs or spiders until there was sufficient evidence that dries would be superior. I do like my dry fly fishing but want to improve my nymph technique.

I stopped back at the quarry to see what was happening there and after a very interesting half hour, observing proceedings decided to seek out more of the anglers and try to get some photos. I wasn’t too bothered about fishing and so headed to Horsemill Inn to see if any were there, but found no one. I then moved up to Winchester Avenue and again found no one. I decided to give the end of the run down here a wee go with my flies and had a couple of small wild fish in about my first 6 casts. So not a blank for me!

 

  • The fish in the video above was encountered in the area of some of the anglers and wasn’t interested in anything thrown its way, even when a nymph near enough hit it on the nose. I suspect it was a Sea Trout. I did see it move out of its lie a few times to take what I suspect were nymphs, just not artificials.

    The Stick fish

    Kevin with a specimen “Stick-fish”

    After stopping for a chat with a guy who was sat on a bench and seemed astonished at my near magical powers to pluck fish from the river in a small number of fish ( I did assure him such hit rates are not the norm for me) I was joined by a few of the rest of the group who had a wee fish here.

    I then moved upstream while they headed down and had a wee fish up some shady runs under the trees. As I approached some rising fish I was rudely interrupted by a bunch of “Jakeys” who just marched into the river in front of me and proceeded to throw spinners orRapala’ss into the water I was about to fish…. I was less than impressed and made my feelings knowing. These were not youngsters by any means. They soon cleared off but not before one had pulled his spinner through the run I was approaching.  A pointless effort.

    I decided to jump back in the car and headed back to Horsemill Inn and went for a browse there, where about I encountered the lads from the Quarry who had moved upstream. They had had a couple of decent fish though  I think they hadn’t stuck but they had good sport by all accounts.

    In the glide I like downstream I fished through once and got one small wild fish and could hear the odd fish rise though never seemed to catch sight of it. I was fishing Klink and Dink initially ( duo) on a short line but then went back to fishing a team of three nymphs/spiders still on a  short line. With nothing else to show for it I wondered what to do next, I was sure there had to be more here so decided to change tack and took out my Green Mucilin and greased my Czech nymph indicator and my nymph line and fished it flat to the water over a longer range. I had read about this in a book I got recently and would have to recommend. Clear concise and easy to follow. It actually recommends not to use the beaded type indicator I had but in fact, it floated just fine when greased up and was way more sensitive than feel alone. I went back to where I started and started over again over the same water. Almost right away I detected ( didn’t feel) a take and lifted into a nice wild fish. Then I had what I reckon was a pretty standard stock fish, of about a 1lb which managed to break off my middle dropper. After replacing this I then had fish after fish, and actually, they came so thick and fast I actually lost count! I think in total I had about 10 for the day with a few lost as well. Most were wild fish of 6 or 7″ but there were another couple of recent stockies in amongst them great fun and revealed what a great method French Nymphing can be.

     

    Overall a great day, great weather and a lot of fun, I think most if not all the anglers caught fish and you can’t ask fairer than that.

    A set of unwatermarked Hi Res images is available on Flickr at this link .